directing Star Trek:The Motion Picture
Wise had proven that he could make star-studded big films in the '60s, but the artist in him needed to keep taking risks to push his talents even further.

Intent on making a more modern story after a series of period films, Wise returned to science fiction with THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN (1971), an adaptation of Michael Crichton's bestseller.

"...it's a step of working with the designer and the sketch artist and getting actual compositions, actual setups, and having the cameraman coming in and looking at all this and bringing his contribution to it. Film is a visual art, let's face it. You want to get as much out of all your associates as you can."
—Robert Wise, AFI Seminar



Boris Leven, Production Designer
Wise Films

WEST SIDE STORY
TWO FOR THE SEESAW
THE SOUND OF MUSIC
THE SAND PEBBLES
STAR!
THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN
Robert Wise

Committed to infusing more social commentary into his films, Wise shot TWO PEOPLE (1973), a love story starring Lindsay Wagner and Peter Fonda that looked at how the Vietnam War was affecting young Americans. TWO PEOPLE also marks another effort Wise made with Mark Robson to disconnect himself from studio involvement—they founded a company called the Filmmakers Group. (This would be the only Wise film made for the company.)

SOME ACTORS WHO MADE THEIR FIRST SIGNIFICANT SCREEN APPEARANCE IN WISE FILMS
On the set of THE HINDENBERG Lindsay Wagner, TWO PEOPLE (1971)
Arthur Hill, ANDROMEDA STRAIN (1971)
John Astin, WEST SIDE STORY (1960)
Sandra Dee, UNTIL THEY SAIL (1957)
Irene Papas, TRIBUTE TO A BAD MAN (1956)
Robert Loggia, SOMEBODY UP THERE LIKES ME (1956)
Steve McQueen, SOMEBODY UP THERE LIKES ME (1956)
Brigitte Bardot, HELEN OF TROY (1955)
Richard Beymer, SO BIG (1953)
John Forsythe, CAPTIVE CITY (1952)

Wise became one of the filmmaking communities most outspoken opponents of the Supreme Court's 1973 ruling that redefined obscenity after he had to tone down a sensuous love scene in TWO PEOPLE.

Fascinated by lighter-than-air ships and the Hindenburg's disastrous flight, Wise directed THE HINDENBURG (1975) Directing Star Trekafter a two-year break from films. The film earned an Oscar for best special effects, a reflection of Wise's tireless research on the dirigible.

After AUDREY ROSE (1977), a story about reincarnation, Wise wrapped up the decade with his direction of the first screen version of STAR TREK (1979)—a big special effects film fraught with obstacles but handled with the kind of skill that could have only been borne from a seasoned veteran like Wise.

"I think that beyond a director's artistic and creative abilities, there are two things that he must be very, very aware of, and those are anticipation and communication. Which is to say, anticipating what you want the next day or the next week, and communicating those needs to your staff and crew."

—Robert Wise, AFI Seminar


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